Monthly Archive: October 2019

AP-NORC Poll: Trump Approval Steady as Impeachment Rages

President Donald Trump’s approval rating is holding steady as the House presses forward with an impeachment probePresident Donald Trump’s approval rating is holding steady as the House presses forward with an impeachment probe that could imperil his presidency, according to a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. But there are warning signs in the survey for Trump.Though Trump remains overwhelmingly popular within his own party, some Republicans have a critical view of the president’s honesty, his discipline and his respect for America’s democratic norms. Overall, 61% of Americans say Trump has little or no respect for the country’s democratic institutions and traditions, an issue that strikes at the heart of the impeachment inquiry focused in part on whether he sought a foreign government’s help for personal political gain.Trump has fought back against the House probe with the same strategy that has buoyed him throughout the other investigations and controversies that have consumed his first three years in office: casting the investigations as politically motivated and repeatedly disparaging his opponents, often in bitingly personal terms. Republicans are so far sticking with him, with 85% saying they approve of Trump.“The Democrats will not let the president do his job,” said Robert Little, a 73-year-old Republican from Kannapolis, North Carolina. “Ever since he’s been in office, he’s done a lot of good things for the United States, but the Democrats’ only agenda is to get rid of Trump.”Overall, 42% of Americans approve of Trump’s handling of the job, in line with where he has been throughout his tenure. Just 7% of Democrats have a positive view of Trump as president.Divisive natureTrump’s job approval rating and other markers in the survey underscore the deeply divisive nature of his presidency, with Republicans largely favoring his actions and Democrats overwhelmingly disapproving. As Trump eyes his reelection campaign, it suggests his path to victory will hinge on rallying higher turnout among his core supporters as opposed to persuading new voters to back his bid for a second term.The biggest bright spot for Trump remains the economy, which has continued to grow despite warning signs of a downturn. Fifty-four percent of Americans approve of Trump’s handling of the economy, including a quarter of Democrats.Trump inherited a growing economy from his predecessor, Barack Obama, and the trajectory has remained positive, with the unemployment rate hovering below 4%. But economists have warned that Trump’s push to levy tariffs on China puts economic gains at risk, and a majority of Americans, 55%, disapprove of Trump’s handling of trade negotiations with other countries.Critical of foreign policyAmericans are more critical of Trump’s handling of foreign policy, with 59% disapproving of how he’s handling that issue. The public is also skeptical that Trump’s actions as president have been good for America’s standing in the world; 46% said his policies have done more harm than good, while 39% said they have had a more positive impact.The poll was conducted almost entirely before Trump announced on Sunday that Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi had been killed in a U.S. raid in Syria.Trump was elected in 2016 with low marks from voters on an array of personal attributes, including honesty, and those assessments haven’t changed. Trump frequently repeats false statements and spreads conspiracy theories that have been debunked, including by members of his own administration.More than half of Americans, 56%, said the word “honest” does not describe the president. Among Republicans, views are also mixed on Trump’s honesty: Just about half say “honest” describes Trump very or extremely well.Republicans concernedEven fewer Republicans have a positive view on Trump’s level of self-control, with just 39% saying “disciplined” is a very good way to describe the president, who often lashes out at critics and airs a myriad of grievances. Another 29% say it describes him moderately well, but about as many say it doesn’t describe him well.The result is an electorate with raw emotions about the president. Nearly half say Trump makes them feel angry. And four in 10 Americans, including about 2 in 10 Republicans, say the president makes them feel overwhelmed.“It wears you down, it wears you out,” said Bill Cathey, a 57-year-old independent from Charlotte, North Carolina. “And kind of dampens your spirit throughout the day.” 



Посольство Ізраїлю в Україні відновить роботу 1 листопада

Посольство Ізраїлю в Україні відновить свою роботу 1 листопада за рішенням суду. Про це повідомили у диппредставництві.

«Наша боротьба ще не закінчилась, вона лише тимчасово призупинена за рішенням суду. Завтра, в п’ятницю, 1 листопада, ми відновимо роботу посольства на постійній основі», – мовиться у повідомленні.

 

Міністерство закордонних справ Ізраїлю повідомило, що змушене закрити усі посольства Ізраїлю по світу, в тому числі в Україні. Причиною закриття дипломати називають внутрішній конфлікт з Міністерством фінансів Ізраїлю через зміни протоколу, «який був протягом кількох десятиліть».

Як повідомив ізраїльський «9 канал», робочий комітет міністерств закордонних справ і оборони Ізраїлю заявив, що такі дії є протестом проти рішення Міністерства фінансів скоротити витрати ізраїльських дипломатів по всьому світу і спробувати застосувати нові правила звітності до витрат, здійснених раніше.



US House Votes to Formally Open Impeachment Inquiry Targeting Trump

The Democratic-controlled U.S. House of Representatives voted Thursday to authorize a public impeachment inquiry targeting President Donald Trump after weeks of testimony behind closed doors about his efforts to push Ukraine to investigate his political opponents.The vote was along party lines, 232-196 for the impeachment inquiry, with all Republicans against the resolution and two Democratic defectors joining them.Immediately after the vote, Trump called the impeachment inquiry, “The Greatest Witch Hunt In American History!” in a tweet.The Greatest Witch Hunt In American History!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 31, 2019White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham issued a statement saying the president “has done nothing wrong” and calling the process “unfair, unconstitutional, and fundamentally un-American.””Nancy Pelosi and the Democrats’ unhinged obsession with this illegitimate impeachment proceeding does not hurt President Trump; it hurts the American people,” she said.
House Speaker Pelosi had long opposed opening an impeachment inquiry, but has turned sharply against Trump and called for passage of the impeachment rules. As debate opened Thursday, she said “nobody” comes to Congress to impeach a president, “unless his actions are jeopardizing us honoring our oath of office.””Sadly, this is not any cause for any glee or comfort,” she said. “This is something that is very solemn.”Republicans had for weeks demanded that the majority Democrats hold a vote to authorize the impeachment probe against the Republican president, but as the vote neared they attacked it as an attempt to justify what they contend are sham hearings that have already been held.House members vote on the House resolution to move forward with procedures for the next phase of the impeachment inquiry into President Trump in the House Chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Oct. 31, 2019.Whistleblower
One of the president’s staunchest supporters, Congressman Jim Jordan, called the inquiry “an unfair partisan process,” and assailed the fact that the name of the intelligence community whistleblower who touched off the impeachment push against Trump has not been disclosed.The whistleblower has been described by news organizations as a Central Intelligence Agency employee who once worked in the White House. He was the first official to voice concerns that Trump in a late July phone call had pressed Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskiy to open investigations about one of Trump’s chief 2020 Democratic rivals, former Vice President Joe Biden, his son Hunter Biden’s work for a Ukrainian natural gas company and any links the eastern European country might have had to try to defeat Trump in the 2016 election.The phone call came at a time when Trump was temporarily withholding $391 million in military aid to Ukraine that it wanted to help in its fight against Russian separatists in the eastern part of the country.Trump has denied any quid pro quo deal with Zelenskiy, although several White House national security officials and career diplomats have told the impeachment investigators that Trump wanted the Ukraine investigations to help him politically.Soliciting and receiving foreign contributions in an election is illegal under U.S. campaign finance law.Trump, who last month released a rough transcript of his call with Zelenskiy, has described the call as “perfect” and claimed that the whistleblower misrepresented it. But much of what the whistleblower alleged about Trump looking for “a favor” from Zelenskiy — the investigations — has been borne out in subsequent testimony from other officials familiar with Trump’s call and his relations with Ukraine.”READ THE TRANSCRIPT!” Trump said Thursday on Twitter.READ THE TRANSCRIPT!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 31, 2019In setting up Thursday’s vote, Pelosi told her Democratic colleagues, “We are taking this step to eliminate any doubt as to whether the Trump Administration may withhold documents, prevent witness testimony, disregard duly authorized subpoenas, or continue obstructing the House of Representatives.”Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said the resolution “falls way short” of bringing fairness and due process to the inquiry.”I understand that many House Democrats made up their minds on impeachment years ago,” McConnell said. “But our basic norms of justice do not evaporate just because Washington Democrats have already made up their minds.”Impeachment trial
If the full House, on a simple majority vote, eventually impeaches Trump, his trial would be held in the Republican-majority Senate, where a two-thirds vote to convict him to remove him from office would be required. With the votes of at least 20 Republicans needed to convict Trump, his removal from office remains unlikely.Thus far, the House Intelligence, Foreign Affairs and Oversight committees have heard closed-door testimony from diplomats and other officials as they probe whether Trump should be impeached for urging a foreign country, Ukraine, to dig up dirt on a political rival with the aim of helping his re-election bid.The resolution calls for moving to public hearings with the House Intelligence committee eventually issuing a report on its findings and recommendations to the House Judiciary Committee, which would then be responsible for deciding whether to recommend that the full House impeach Trump.Former top national security adviser to President Donald Trump, Tim Morrison, arrives for a closed door meeting to testify as part of the House impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, Oct. 31, 2019.The committees are scheduled to hear testimony Thursday from Timothy Morrison, who was Trump’s top Russian and European affairs adviser on the National Security Council until he resigned Wednesday, according to a senior administration official.House Democrats said Wednesday they want to hear from former National Security Adviser John Bolton and asked that he testify next week.Several other witnesses have testified that Bolton was deeply disturbed that Trump’s personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, was working behind the scenes to pressure Ukraine to investigate Democrats and 2020 presidential candidate Biden for alleged corruption — evidence of which has never surfaced.Giuliani was apparently running what critics call a “shadow foreign policy” behind the back of the State Department. Bolton was said to have called Giuliani’s work a “drug deal” and that he wanted nothing to do with it.Trump fired Bolton last month after they clashed on several fronts, including Ukraine.A lawyer for Bolton says he is “not willing to appear voluntarily,” which means the House committees would have to issue a subpoena if they want to him to appear.One of witnesses in Wednesday’s testimony, Foreign Service officer and Ukraine expert Christopher Anderson, said Bolton cautioned him about dealing with Giuliani, warning that Giuliani could complicate diplomatic efforts to improve ties between Washington and Kyiv.Another Foreign Service officer, Catherine Croft, told the House committees she had received a number of telephone calls from former Republican congressman turned lobbyist Robert Livingston, telling her that U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch should be fired.She said Livingston described Yovanovitch as an “Obama holdover” and “associated with George Soros,” a longtime supporter of liberal causes.”It was not clear to me at the time, or now, at whose direction or at whose expense Mr. Livingston was seeking the removal of Ambassador Yovanovitch,” Croft said.Trump fired Yovanovitch in May. She testified that she was replaced because of “unfounded and false claims by people with clearly questionable motives.”Meanwhile in the Senate, Trump’s nominee to become the new U.S. ambassador to Russia, John Sullivan, said at his confirmation hearing he knew Giuliani was involved in efforts to fire Yovanovitch.When asked whether a president should ask a foreign power to investigate his political opponents, Sullivan replied, “I don’t think that would be in accord with our values.”*/

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Mayors for Pete: Buttigieg Hunts for Support in City Halls

As Pete Buttigieg works to prove the leader of a city of roughly 100,000 people is ready to assume the American presidency, he’s relying on help from politicians who would know best: his fellow mayors.The South Bend, Indiana, mayor has amassed a network of roughly 60 “Mayors for Pete,” a collection of local leaders pushing for his underdog bid. The group includes mayors from former industrial cities, thriving metros and tiny towns of just a few thousand people. It includes the mayor of Dayton, Ohio, a Rust Belt city like the one Buttigieg leads, and the mayor of West Sacramento, California, a rising progressive leader.
About a third are from swing states Democrats need to win to take the White House. But just three are from the early voting states Buttigieg needs to win to become Democrats’ presidential nominee.The campaign believes the mayors bring credibility to the 37-year-old Buttigieg’s chief pitch, a promise to usher in the next generation of Democratic politics and a more pragmatic, no-excuses style of governing.“He’s a mayor, which means that unlike a lot of people who are running for that office, he’s in a place where he actually has to get things done,” said Steve Adler, the mayor of Austin, Texas, who endorsed Buttigieg in April, passing over Beto O’Rourke, a home state candidate.But Buttigieg’s list also highlights one of his chief weaknesses in the Democratic primary. Adler aside, the group is short on mayors who represent America’s largest cities, and on city leaders who aren’t white. It’s an omission that reflects Buttigieg’s trouble winning over black voters, a critical group of the Democratic primary electorate, amid criticism of his handling of the fatal shooting of a black man by a white police officer in South Bend.Meanwhile, some of his competitors have picked up big names: Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan are backing Joe Biden. Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney just endorsed Elizabeth Warren.Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, who flirted with a presidential run himself, has not yet offered an endorsement, nor has Lori Lightfoot, Chicago’s first black and LGBT mayor and a rising Democratic star. Many mayors of majority black cities in the South still haven’t endorsed anyone.Senior Buttigieg campaign adviser Jess O’Connell said that winning support from mayors is just a piece of the campaign’s overall strategy for capturing the nomination and that she hopes the list of mayors will grow as the Democratic field winnows to fewer candidates.“For now, what we most want are people that know Mayor Pete and understand his style,” she said. “But we know we have more to do to earn everybody’s endorsement.”Adrian Perkins of Shreveport, Louisiana, is one of the mayors who hasn’t yet committed. Perkins went to Harvard Law School and served in the military like Buttigieg; the two connected through a friend when Perkins, 33, was still in school and Buttigieg took time to offer him advice.But Perkins said his endorsement must be the best choice for his city, a majority black community experiencing major floods that he attributes to climate change. Perkins, who is black, acknowledged that Buttigieg has a perception problem with some black voters, but he said that could change if people get to know him.“It would go a long way for Pete, on coming here and me putting him in front of some of the African Americans in my community, so they can see who I see in him,” he said.Buttigieg has already won over Sly James, the former mayor of Kansas City, Missouri, and former head of the African American Mayors Association, and Michelle De La Isla, the first Latina mayor of Topeka, Kansas. Christropher Cabaldon, of West Sacramento, is Filipino, part of the West’s growing Asian-Pacific Islander community.While smaller-city mayors may not seem like coveted presidential endorsements, they are more closely connected to voters than most politicians and are responsible for functions of government that often have a more direct impact on voters’ lives.“I think that right now you see a complete breakdown of state and federal politics, and the only place you see governing happening and stuff getting done is at the local level,” said Nan Whaley, the mayor of Dayton, Ohio.Whaley, Adler and Cabaldon met Buttigieg through the U.S Conference of Mayors and developed friendships. Cabaldon, who came out as gay in 2006 while serving as mayor, sought Buttigieg out at the conference in 2015, after Buttigieg came out, to offer support. Three years later, he was a guest at Buttigieg’s wedding to husband Chasten.All three spoke at Buttigieg’s campaign launch in April, where the effort to win support from other mayors began.As impeachment battles consume Washington, Cabaldon said, Buttigieg can provide an alternative focused on actual governance, not partisan bickering.“We don’t fight to the death in local government,” he said.The mayors have a call every other week with a campaign staffer dedicated to working with mayors, where they toss around policy ideas, discuss Buttigieg’s upcoming schedule and connect the campaign with interested people, Whaley said.O’Connell, the senior campaign adviser, said the campaign has drawn from various cities to build out its policy proposals.Whaley said she’s helped at least three Ohio mayors who aren’t backing Buttigieg connect local donors or activists with the campaign. Adler has set up fundraisers and facilitated community meetings, including with Austin’s black and Hispanic communities.“Mayors know the leadership of every one of their communities,” Whaley said.Buttigieg won the endorsement of Victory Fund, a group that helps LGBT candidates raise money that is headed by Annise Parker, the former Houston mayor who is backing his bid. Buttigieg didn’t automatically win the group’s endorsement, instead having to prove he was competitive first, Parker said.With so many other current and former mayors running for president – Cory Booker (Newark), Julian Castro (San Antonio) and, previously, Bill de Blasio (New York) – Parker said Buttigieg’s ability to win over his colleagues stands out. One telling indicator is that mayors across the country stood up and said, “We like this one,” Parker said.



Столярчук оскаржив у суді своє звільнення з посади заступника генпрокурора

Юрій Столярчук оскаржив у суді своє звільнення з посади заступника генерального прокурора України, повідомила пресслужба Окружного адміністративного суду Києва.

«Позивач просить суд визнати протиправним та скасувати наказ Генерального прокурора від 25 вересня 2019 року про звільнення його з посади заступника Генпрокурора. Водночас позивач просить поновити його на зазначеній посаді», – розповіли в Окружному адмінсуді Києва.

Суд вирішує питання про відкриття провадження в цій справі.

В установі нагадали, що Сергій Кізь також оскаржує своє звільнення з посади заступника генерального прокурора.

І Кізь, і Столярчук працювали заступниками колишнього генерального прокурора Юрія Луценка. У вересні їх звільнив новий очільник ГПУ Руслан Рябошапка.



Fundraisers at Trump Properties Trigger Ethics Concerns

U.S. President Donald Trump’s attended two fundraisers this week, raking in millions of dollars for the Trump 2020 and House Republican campaigns. The events, both held at Trump’s own properties in Washington and Chicago are drawing continued scrutiny and charges of ethics violations that the president brushes aside. White House Correspondent Patsy Widakuswara has this report.



Ситуація на Донбасі: 19 обстрілів з боку бойовиків, втрат серед українських військових немає

У зоні бойових дій на Донбасі впродовж доби 30 жовтня та в перші години 31 жовтня не зафіксовано втрат серед українських військових, повідомляє штаб операції Об’єднаних сил. За цими даними, підтримувані Росією бойовики впродовж минулої доби 19 разів порушили режим припинення вогню, застосовуючи і зброю, заборонену мінськими домовленостями, зокрема, міномети калібрів 120 та 82 міліметри.

Угруповання «ДНР» ще не наводило зведених даних про бойові дії 30 жовтня. В угрупованні «ЛНР» українських військових звинуватили в шести обстрілах упродовж минулої доби.

 

Обстріли в зоні конфлікту на Донбасі тривають, попри оголошене там від 21 липня перемир’я. Сторони звинувачують одна одну в порушеннях режиму тиші.

Збройний конфлікт на Донбасі триває від 2014 року після російської окупації Криму. Україна і Захід звинувачують Росію у збройній підтримці бойовиків. Кремль відкидає ці звинувачення і заявляє, що на Донбасі можуть перебувати хіба що російські «добровольці».

За оцінками ООН, станом на 31 грудня 2018 року, унаслідок збройного конфлікту на Донбасі загинули від 12 тисяч 800 до 13 тисяч людей.



US House Expected to Pass Resolution on Impeachment Process

The U.S. House of Representatives is expected to pass a resolution Thursday formally setting out the process by which committees will continue carrying out the inquiry into whether President Donald Trump should face impeachment.The vote is likely to show the divide in the House between the majority Democrats whose leaders have argued there was no need to bring forth such a resolution to make the process legitimate and the minority Republicans who have thus far opposed the inquiry as too closed of a process and not giving them an equal part.“We are taking this step to eliminate any doubt as to whether the Trump administration may withhold documents, prevent witness testimony, disregard duly authorized subpoenas, or continue obstructing the House of Representatives,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a letter to Democratic lawmakers.Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., center, walks to the podium with Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., left, and Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, Oct. 29, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington.Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said the resolution “falls way short” of bringing fairness and due process into the inquiry.“I understand that many House Democrats made up their minds on impeachment years ago. But our basic norms of justice do not evaporate just because Washington Democrats have already made up their minds,” McConnell said.Closed-door meetingsThus far, the House Intelligence, Foreign Affairs and Oversight committees have heard closed-door testimony from diplomats and other officials as they probe whether Trump should be impeached for urging a foreign country, Ukraine, to dig up dirt on a political rival with the aim of helping his re-election bid.The resolution calls for moving to public hearings with the House Intelligence committee eventually issuing a report on its findings and recommendations to the House Judiciary Committee, which would then be responsible for deciding whether to recommend the full House impeach Trump.The committees are scheduled to hear testimony Thursday from Timothy Morrison, who was Trump’s top Russian and European affairs adviser on the National Security Council until he resigned Wednesday, according to a senior administration official.House Democrats said Wednesday they want to hear from former National Security Adviser John Bolton and asked that he testify next week.Several other witnesses have testified that Bolton was deeply disturbed that Trump’s personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, was working behind the scenes to pressure Ukraine to investigate Democrats and 2020 presidential candidate Biden for alleged corruption — evidence of which has never surfaced.Giuliani was apparently running what critics call a “shadow foreign policy” behind the back of the State Department. Bolton was said to have called Giuliani’s work a “drug deal” and that he wanted nothing to do with it.FILE – Former National Security Adviser John Bolton gestures while speaking at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, Sept. 30, 2019.Subpoena for BoltonTrump fired Bolton last month after they clashed on several fronts, including Ukraine.Bolton has laid low since he left the White House. A lawyer for Bolton says he is “not willing to appear voluntarily,” which means the House committees would have to issue a subpoena if they want to him to appear.One of witnesses in Wednesday’s testimony, Foreign Service officer and Ukraine expert Christopher Anderson, said Bolton cautioned him about dealing with Giuliani, warning that Giuliani could complicate diplomatic efforts to improve ties between Washington and Kyiv.Another Foreign Service officer, Catherine Croft, told the House committees she had received a number of telephone calls from former Republican congressman turned lobbyist Robert Livingston, telling her that U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch should be fired.FILE – Former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch, center, leaves Capitol Hill, Oct. 11, 2019, in Washington, after testifying before congressional lawmakers.She said Livingston described Yovanovitch as an “Obama holdover” and “associated with George Soros,” a longtime supporter of liberal causes.“It was not clear to me at the time, or now, at whose direction or at whose expense Mr. Livingston was seeking the removal of Ambassador Yovanovitch,” Croft said.Trump fired Yovanovitch in May. She testified that she was replaced because of “unfounded and false claims by people with clearly questionable motives.”Meanwhile in the Senate, Trump’s nominee to become the new U.S. Ambassador to Russia, John Sullivan, said at his confirmation hearing he knew Giuliani was involved in efforts to fire Yovanovitch.When asked whether a president should ask a foreign power to investigate his political opponents, Sullivan replied “I don’t think that would be in accord with our values.”Trump has called the impeachment inquiry a witch hunt and a hoax. He described his July 25 telephone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy, during which he is said to have asked for the investigations, as “perfect.” The White House released a rough transcript of the Trump-Zelenskiy call.*/

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[X]Explore the timeline of the impeachment inquiry.Explore the timeline of the impeachment inquiry
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Поліція розповіла про ситуацію в Золотому-4 після початку відведення військ

Піші та мобільні наряди цілодобово патрулюють Золоте-4 Луганської області після початку відведення сил і засобів, повідомила пресслужба Національної поліції України.

«Ми контролюємо весь периметр під’їзду та виїзду із селища, патрулюємо вулиці. Тобто зусилля поліцейських спрямовані на забезпечення правопорядку. Ми охороняємо громадський спокій», – розповів заступник голови Національної поліції Вадим Троян.

1 жовтня в столиці Білорусі Мінську учасники Тристоронньої контактної групи щодо мирного врегулювання ситуації на сході України домовилися про початок розведення сил і засобів біля Петрівського Донецької області і Золотого-4 Луганської області із 7 жовтня.

29 жовтня штаб української воєнної Операції об’єднаних сил повідомив, що о 12:00 почався процес розведення сил і засобів у районі Золотого-4 на Луганщині.

30 жовтня українська сторона СЦКК заявила, що перед початком розведення сил і засобів підтримувані Росією бойовики не дотримали умови про відсутність обстрілів поблизу Золотого в Луганській області упродовж семи днів.

 




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